Labor Day Walk the Trail – Albion Michigan 2017

Labor Day Walk the Trail Albion Michigan

Labor Day Walk the Trail Albion Michigan

The end of one season and the beginning of another is quickly approaching. This time of year thousands of people will be headed to our upper peninsula in anticipation of walking across the Mackinac Bridge. For those not participating in this annual walk, you are invited to share in Albion’s Labor Day Walk the Trail.

The Albion Health Care Alliance invited the community out on Monday, September 4, 2017, Labor Day, to walk the trail. The event took place at 10:00am until 11:00am. Participants were asked to meet at the beginning of the trail, just off Hannah Street in Victory Park, close to Victory for Kids playground area.

Everyone is welcome to attend and walk: families, Albion College faculty, staff, and students, youth and those young in heart from the community and surrounding areas. It is a fun event that celebrates the walking trail and the end of summer. The Albion River Trail is approximately 1.6 miles long. One can walk the length in one direction, and then return by the same route, or choose another one to your own liking; walking at your own pace.

The Albion River Trail is now part of the North Country National Scenic Trail. See the map about this part of the trail on this link:

http://www.northcountrytrail.org/cnd/coref_albion.html

See a brochure with information about the Albion River Trail on this link:
http://albionmich.net/albion-river-trail-brochure/
Motorized vehicles are not permitted.

Albion River Trail Extension

The Albion River Trail is being extended to go to the Nancy Held Equestrian Center.

Here is some information from Albion EDC:

Positive Impacts flier

“Trail Town Designation   The City of Albion has been recognized by the Michigan Department of Resources (DNR) as the “hub” for Michigan trails. Two national walking and biking trails – the North Country National Scenic Trail (NCNST) and the Great Lake‐to‐Lake Trail – along with Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail converge at Albion’s historic Victory Park, one of Albion’s 17 scenic parks.  In addition, Albion was awarded a $294,000 Trust Fund Grant from the DNR to expand the Albion River Trail.  The trail will extend past the newly‐renovated Albion College Equestrian Center. The City recognizes the importance of the community’s trails as an asset and seeks to be designated as a Trail Town. Trails would have signage posted that would allow for promoting and identifying the amenities and attractions that would be of interest to trail users at access points.”

 

 

River Trail Walk

Time to walk the bridge on Labor Day! If you can’t make it to the Mackinac Bridge, come to Albion!

Albion Labor Day River Trail Walk 2016

The traditional Albion Labor Day River Trail Walk is sponsored by the Albion Health Care Alliance.  Everyone is invited.  Here is the official event page: albionhca.org/events.html

We are now including more options added for limited mobility and limited time walks.  At 10 a.m. on Labor Day (September 4, 2017)  please meet for a group photo by the Victory for Kids playground in Victory Park.  After that we will do the Labor Day Bridge Walk over the Albion foot bridge.  From there, some people had a car waiting on the other side of the bridge, others continued the walk on the Albion River Trail to Harris Field.  (1.5 miles)  Most people opt to walk back for the full walk of 3 miles.

Others had dropped off cars previously at Harris Field and carpooled back. In this way more people decided to customize the walk to their own schedule.  Fresh cold bottled water was supplied at the 2016 walk by Culligan Water in Albion.  It was a refreshing day, all around.

See the 2017 event on Facebook and invite your friends!

Civil Rights Monuments and Sculptures in Michigan and Canada

There was a trail to the north before the Civil War, that was unmarked, except for stories of following the North Star, looking for moss on the north sides of trees, and key words that helpers would know. This was called the Underground Railroad. Across Michigan and into Canada, there is a trail today, that is marked with much more visible reminders of this challenging time in our history. Today we can visit monuments, or just read about them here online, and learn about how far we have come, and how far we still have to go.

Albion Community Bike Ride Program

Albion_bike_rides

The Kick Off ride is Saturday May 14, 10:00 a.m. 

All other rides start at 9am.

Have some safe bike riding fun this summer in Albion on Saturday mornings.

Here is how to do it with commentary from the General Guide to Arts & Trails, AlbionMich.net.

Meet at Albion City Hall (112 West Cass Street, Albion, Michigan)  It’s the same day as the French Market and Farmer’s Market – both in Stoffer Plaza.  We will end up there after the ride – fun to see people there, and maybe pick up some fresh produce.

 

Victory Park Waterfall – Aerial View

Aerial drone photo of Victory Park Waterfall by Gannon Cottone – March 18, 2016
Aerial drone photo of Victory Park Waterfall by Gannon Cottone – March 18, 2016
Aerial drone photo of Victory Park Waterfall – March 18, 2016

This view of the waterfall in Victory Park shows one of the most beautiful views of Albion’s natural landscape. It is perhaps the largest landmark of Albion, except for Albion’s brick “Main Street” (Superior Street.)

Some background about the Victory Park waterfall is provided by Frank Passic:  (used with permission)
“It’s an Albion landmark that is so routinely noticed, that it has remained unnoticed when listing the assets of our community. It’s the Victory Park dam/waterfall. This cement structure was built to hold back and regulate the waters of the South Branch of the Kalamazoo River in order to produce electric power at the Commonwealth Power Company plant on E. Erie St. The Company had purchased the old Red flour mill on E. Erie St. and converted it into making electricity. The water behind the dam/waterfall was called the millpond. The mill part referred to the flour and sawmills that were once located downstream in a variety of locations. They harnessed the water power to turn the wheels which ground the grain. For example, the Citizens Bank building was once a water-powered flour mill built by Jesse Crowell in 1845.

Adjacent to the dam was a “raceway” where the flowing water “raced” to the mills. This was kept deep in order to provide adequate flowing water pressure by time the water reached the mills downhill. When the mills were working, water was diverted through the raceway, and the flow of water over the Victory Park dam was greatly diminished to the point where there were some bare spots. ”

2005, is a special year. It marks the 100th anniversary of the building of our present Victory Park dam. It was in September, 1905 that local contractor George E. Dean (1872-1932) built our present cement dam to replace the old stone one that had existed at the site since Albion’s pioneer days. The new dam was built over the old one. Mr. Dean, as you might recall, laid Albion’s first cement sidewalks in 1901. One of the last stretches of these walks was finally removed this past fall in September 2004 in the 800 and 900 blocks of S. Eaton St. His sidewalks might now be gone, but his dam remains today! Also during September, 1905, Mr. Dean built the Hannah St. bridge at “Dutchtown,” which included a decorative arch underneath. This bridge is often pictured in postcards of the period.

When the new dam was built, Mr. Dean had to let the water out of the millpond (that’s up by S. Superior St. and Riverside Cemetery) in order to let the cement dry. This created fish traps in holes, where people scooped up large fish by hand in the rocks below the dam. Imagine what the area around Riverside Cemetery would look like today if the water was “let out” as it was in 1905.

The dam area contained various features and contraptions which were used in the regulation of the water for generating purposes. That accounts for the various metal rods that stick up here and there in the structure complex, including the triangular shaped piece of cement in the very center. On the south footbridge below, there is a metal property line boundary marker imbedded in it that states, “Consumers Power.” One special aspect of the dam was the building of a “fish ladder.” This was so fish could swim upstream. It was located on the north side of the dam.

Consumer’s Power Company used the millrace to generate electricity at its E. Erie St. plant until shortly after World War II. Apparently the millpond was filling up with silt and the water pressure (which turned the generators) was lessening as a result. For whatever reason, Consumers abandoned local water powered electricity in Albion. The closest date I can come up with is around 1948 when water powered electric generating stopped. If anyone has an accurate date, please let me know.

After that point, Consumer’s abandoned the site, and much of the land was acquired by the City of Albion. The raceway was filled in the Market Place, and three ponds were fashioned out of what remained upstream. The first was developed to become the skating pond at Rieger Park. The second just north of Walnut St. was transformed into an outdoor hockey rink. This was shaved down and finally eliminated by the 1980s. The pond by the dam still stands today, with the old mechanism used to raise and lower the gates still there, though unused. A buried drain line carries the flowing water into the Rieger Park pond today. The water then exists into the Kalamazoo River, instead of flowing across E. Erie St. as it once did to the Consumer’s Power building.

victory_park_albion_michigan_waterfall_fishladder
1907 Fish Ladder at the Dam, Victory Park Waterfall, Albion, Michigan, photo provided by Frank Passic

From our Historical Notebook this week we present a photograph taken around 1907 of the Victory Park Dam (Note: the area wasn’t known as Victory Park until after World War I). Notice that the water flow is sporadic in this photo, meaning water was being diverted at the time to the raceway on the side for generating purposes. There are also alot of cattails growing on the south side. A woman is standing on the large cement wall on the north side. In the center bottom below, you can see the edge of the fish ladder which once was located here.

With September, 2005 being the 100th anniversary of the building of our present Victory Park dam, and September also being the month the Festival of the Forks is held, wouldn’t it be appropriate to center a theme around this Albion landmark this year? After all, it is located just above “The Forks,” and this dam site is what provided the waterpower which brought the pioneers to Albion.

 

Source of this information:
http://www.albionmich.com/history/histor_notebook/050206.shtml

Iron Belle Trail in Calhoun County Michigan

iron_belle_trail_map_calhoun_county_michigan_850px

Michigan offers spectacular natural and cultural resources, and hiking or bicycling is a wonderful way to experience the state’s vast array of scenic views, cultural resources, vibrant communities and wildlife resources. Michigan’s Iron Belle Trail links the wealth of existing trails, helps fill gaps where needed, and celebrates the partnerships that have developed and are maintaining the trails. The trail creates opportunities for rural economic development, healthy recreation and awareness of Michigan’s natural resources.

http://www.michigantrails.org/michigans-iron-belle-trail

What is the projected length of the trail?

In its current proposed state, the hiking route will be 1,259 miles and the bicycling route will be 774 miles.

North Country Trail in Calhoun County

north_country_image

Now – in Albion – watch for the sign posts near the Albion River Trail!  This is a walking trail – but some parts of the trail are bike friendly.

The North Country Trail stretches approximately 4,600 miles (7,400 km) from Crown Point in eastern New York to Lake Sakakawea State Park in central North Dakota in the United States. Passing through the seven states of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota, it is the longest of the eleven National Scenic Trails authorized by Congress. Like its sister trails, it was designed to provide outdoor recreational opportunities in some of the America’s outstanding landscapes. As of early 2014, 2,730 miles (4,390 km) have been completed. (source – wikipedia)

To see a brochure of the North Country Trail the newly constructed portion that winds through Albion – click here.

See also the article about Albion becoming a hub of trails.

Also of interest – the North Country Trail home page with an interactive map.

Albion College Whitehouse Nature Center History Trail

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Whitehouse Nature Center at Albion College has some wonderful trails to walk and explore.  Nine sites have been marked with red, white and blue symbols, and a history of each is included, along
with a map, in this brochure.  As you walk the trails, perhaps this brochure will help you understand your role in the story of the land as it is now as well as your place in its future.

After a severe linestorm in 2014, many of the trails needed clearing because over 1,000 trees were lost at the Nature Center. The Whitehouse Nature Center is 140 acres’ worth of outdoor education, and it comes complete with a visitors’ center that houses a classroom, wildlife observation room, and live exhibits of local reptiles and amphibians. We’re owned and operated by Albion College, but our facilities and services are open to public schools and the community for environmental education.

Click here to access a printable brochure with a history trail related to this site. There is also much information on the Albion College website with more information about this valuable community resource.

 

Art and Purple Gang locations near the Albion River Trail

  • albion_michigan_art_trail_map_800px
    This Interactive Google Map shows several types of locations near the Albion River Trail.  There are custom icons and layers with information associated with each marker.  Access by clicking on the markers.
  • Art near the Albion River Trail
  • Purple  Gang locations near the Albion River Trail
  • Albion Parks and their location marked along with the  Albion River Trail.
  • See more information on the Albion River Trail link in the upper menu.